Museum Hours
Showings
Sundance Kabuki CinemasSun, Apr 28, 2013 5:30 PM Not Available
 
Film Info
Section:Tributes
Premiere Status:Austria
USA
Year of Prod:2012
Running Time:107
Original Language:German
English
Credits
dir:Jem Cohen
prod:Paolo Calamita
Jem Cohen
Gabriele Kranzelbinder
scr:Jem Cohen
cam:Jem Cohen
Peter Röhsler
editor:Jem Cohen
Marc Vives
mus:Mary Margaret O’Hara
cast:Mary Margaret O’Hara
Bobby Sommer
Ela Piplits
source:The Cinema Guild
115 West 30th Street, Ste. 800
New York, NY 10001
FAX: 212-685-4717
rkrivoshey@cinemaguild.com
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Description

POV AWARD

In one of Europe’s finest art institutions, Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum, a guard watches patrons as they peruse the priceless paintings that he’s entrusted to keep safe. One day, a cash-strapped woman from Montreal asks him a question, and what transpires over the next few days—conversations about their lives, strolls through the museum, walks around Vienna, visits to the woman’s hospitalized cousin—is a beautiful and poetic exploration of lives that are artful and art that is full of life. Director Jem Cohen tells the story of a chance relationship between two people in late middle age who find they need an outlet for their musings. The guard (Austrian newcomer Bobby Sommer) is a humble philosopher who complements his edgier new acquaintance from Canada (singer-actress Mary Margaret O'Hara). “You will always see something new,” he says about the work in the Kunsthistorisches Museum. Cohen, a veteran filmmaker who has a background in photography, wrote the screenplay for Museum Hours, and he gives each scene -- and each glimpse at a painting like Rembrandt’s Self-Portrait—a dignity and a framing that strikes the right balance of awe and contemplation. Museum Hours effortlessly connects high art to everyday objects we see in the street. Cohen’s drama is both meditative and entertaining—a visual treat that brings new meaning to the idea of “art cinema.”
-Jonathan Curiel

Additional Information

Jem Cohen

For 30 years, Jem Cohen has made an eclectic range of films that take great chances with their subject matter, from This Is a History of New York (1987), which is a pastiche of street footage, to Real Birds (2012), which examines an industrial section of Brooklyn through scenes of birds, thoroughfares and inclement weather. Among the SFIFF 56 POV Award recipient’s other honors are a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and an Independent Spirit Award. In 2005, the Herb Alpert Foundation awarded Cohen with its Alpert Award in the Arts, stating that he “mines the forces, wonders, damages and poetry of everyday life.” Read more about Jem Cohen...

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